Monday, November 17, 2008

Western Sahara is a big lake!


Well, almost. Via blog friend Justin Anthony Knapp, an article about African aquifers and the potential they hold to cause or avert water wars.

The first thing you notice, as Justin pointed out to me, is that Tindouf sadly has nothing. On the plus side, so much underground water in Western Sahara could mean water for Western Saharan agriculture once extraction methods improve.

25 comments:

  1. Anonymous10:49 AM

    Very interesting news indeed! To bad Morocco has so little ground water. This makes it even more important to hang on to Western Sahara.

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  2. I don't think it's cause for concern because so much of Morcco is temperate, as the map shows.

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  3. Anonymous4:34 PM

    It is sadly Algerian Tindouf has nothing but unfortunately Western Saharan Tifariti is also on the dry spots.

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  4. All the more reason to take the rest back! I just think it's fascinating how there's so much water available in a region that seems so dry on its surface.

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  5. hi will, hope you are fine , i don't know if you are aware of it but dakhla a city in the south of moroccan sahara is a big agriculture exporter thanks to this water and methods that we took from israelis :
    http://www.dailymotion.com/relevance/search/dakhla
    %2Bagriculture/video/x4g58h_dakhla-
    sahara-marocain-western-agri_business

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  6. Laroussi8:08 AM

    Saad, you have already posted that link earlier remember?

    As I wrote last time that you posted this link, the info in the video clip is far from correct. For example they say that more than 300.000 people are working in the agricultural industry in Dakhla. You think that a small town like Dakhla has that many inhabitants?

    Further more if I am not mistaken the water used in Dakhla is mainly desalted sea water, as it is in El Ayoun, and not from wells.

    Finally, as far as I can recall Western Sahara is not part of Morocco, even though Morocco is striving to get its semi-annexation recognized internationally.

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  7. no they are saying in the video that the water is from wells, you can seee it, about the number yeah surely a mistake...
    Laroussi are you sahraoui? can you tell me why are you concerned with this problem ? i m moroccan and honestly if the sahraoui were badly threated i will be the first to defend them, i sincelry think that a powerful morocco with its sahara is the best thing for sahraoui and moroccan... the union is the key....
    i am watching a documentary about andalous, it's great what did the "maures" there, and each time they are one they acomplish great things...
    they lost the power because of the strugle for power...
    you don't know wht 's good for the magreb my friend

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  8. Morocco may be temperate now, but the prognosis is not good, if you look at, and accept (tentatively) the results of climate models. These models, which many now think are likely to be conservative, suggest a warming of some 2-4 degrees and a decline in annual mean rainfall of 20-40% by the late 21st century. A study by a Moroccan scientist (Agoumie, 2003) concluded that a 1 degree C increase in temperature over the catchment of Morocco's largest dam would result in around a 10% decrease in surface runoff (i.e. available water). And that's with no change in rainfall. So that aquifer might begin to look much more attractive.

    The Maghreb is one of the areas likely to suffer particularly badly as a result of climate change combined with trends of increasing population and water demand, and Morocco is in a pretty bad position compared with its neighbours, given its lack of oil, lack of access to Saharan aquifers (this one notwithstanding), and the poverty of its population.

    That's not a political comment, by the way. I'm sure those will come later, but for now I'm resisting the juicy temptation Saad is waving under my nose.

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  9. Anonymous6:40 PM

    Well well.. the USDA demands those Dahkla tomatoes to be sealed by the Ministry of Agriculture of Western Sahara.
    How would an official seal from WS look like?

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  10. Anonymous6:59 PM

    Last Anonymous

    this is very interested info.
    any in US have aleady seen WS tomatoes??

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  11. Will, I'm beginning to think the famous Dakhla tomatoes deserve a dedicated post, if not a entire book of poetry to their firm, rosy ripeness.

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  12. Anonymous9:26 AM

    hello. Where was you during that long time. Bad new to inform us that westarn sahara is a lake. when spanish colonialism descovred fosfat in sahara in 1945 one old saharui said ¨ this mine will bring to us more problem. enterr this mine, because it will expose our children to war and death.¨¨
    the man was right. the fosfat and off shore brought to us many problems. We do not will happy with this new information about richness of water.

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  13. a good news for morocco and the moroccan sahara :
    Clinton a close friend of the kingdom will surely be the at the head of the state departement

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  14. Anonymous6:18 AM

    out morocco, out morocco, fuera maruecco, fuera maruecco. sort le marroc, sort le marroc Atfu almgreb, atfu almagreb, barra almagreb, barra almagreb. yatiham attachtat, yatiham attachtat, yatihem el ouel, yatihem el ouel

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  15. well hummm let me think.... : no , we are staying :))

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  16. Anonymous12:18 PM

    Moroccan-Saharawi soap opera in Denmark
    Moroccan-Saharawi soap opera in Denmark
    afrol News, 26 November - Based on Moroccan Ministry of Defence information, four Rabat media report that the representation of Western Sahara in Copenhagen has been ordered to close down by the Danish government. "Rubbish," say Danish sources, adding the false information comes as an answer to Danish media reports over a sex scandal at the Moroccan Embassy.

    'ASM', a publication issued by the Moroccan Ministry of Defence, earlier this week was the first Rabat media to announce that "the government of Denmark" had taken the "decision" to "close down the office of Polisario in Copenhagen." Polisario, a movement fighting for the decolonisation of Western Sahara since the 1970s and which forms the exiled government of this African Union (AU) member country, has relatively good ties with Denmark and other Nordic countries, meaning that its ousting would mean a significant propaganda blow for the Saharawis.

    During the week, also the government-close, but relatively credible Moroccan newspapers 'Le Point' and 'Le Soir' reported about the closure of the Polisario representation in Denmark. Finally today, the more radical 'Le Matin du Sahara et du Maghreb' celebrated the "news" as "a significant decision" by the Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs, due to the Saharawis' "undue political agitation" in the Nordic country.

    But, neither the Danish Foreign Ministry nor the Danish press has reported about any decision to close a "Polisario representation in Copenhagen." Indeed, Danish journalist Ingrid Pedersen, who has followed the Morocco-Western Sahara conflict closely, told afrol News the Moroccan press reports were "pure rubbish."

    Ms Pedersen explains that a closure would be impossible "because Polisario indeed does not have any [accredited] representation office in Denmark. They have a representative that lives in a two-room flat on Amager Island" just outside Copenhagen. "The Foreign Ministry has nothing to do with his businesses, except that he has permission to live and work in Denmark," she adds.

    Polisario's representative in Denmark, Abba Malainin, also denied the Moroccan reports, telling afrol News the "Polisario Representation still working as usual in Denmark." The stories had originated in "the Moroccan propaganda machine," he added.

    Asking several sources in Denmark why Moroccan government-controlled media would publish such a story at this moment, all independently told afrol News that there had to be a connection with "the very amusing story" in Denmark's conservative daily 'Jyllands-Posten' about a sex scandal at the Moroccan Embassy in Copenhagen.

    Consul Raddad el Okbani at the Embassy is accused of sexual harassment and corruption by the Danish-Moroccan population, out of which around 200 took to the streets on 15 November to demand his resignation. Protesters told 'Jyllands-Posten' how the Consul repeatedly had demanded bribes and sexual services to get his signature on official documents. He was also reported to have taken photographs of visitors to the Embassy, threatening with reprisals in Morocco if his personal demands were not met.

    The Consul has been removed from the Moroccan Embassy in Copenhagen, probably having been sent home to Rabat. But the demonstrators are not satisfied, still demanding legal actions to be taken against him.

    Ms Pedersen, notably amused by the seldom scandal in the diplomatic landscape, holds that there may be a connection. The false Polisario office closure story was published "to take away the attention" from the Embassy scandal, she holds. Polisario representative Malainin agrees Moroccan officials had spread the false story "to cover and attract the public opinion from the scandalous shame in Morocco's Embassy in Denmark."

    But, Mr Malainin adds, the scam was also a reaction to Polisario's relative successes in Denmark and other Nordic countries, where some political parties now even are in favour of recognising Western Sahara as a sovereign state, in line with the AU. "The Moroccan system is worrying about the raising awareness and solidarity of the just cause of the Saharawi people ... in all Scandinavia," he holds. "This increasing awareness and solidarity reached to a point that Moroccan system propaganda machine can not influence it," Mr Malainin adds.



    By staff writer

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  17. well propaganda against another propaganda thats rubish the final point of this news is as you said : "because Polisario indeed does not have any [accredited] representation office in Denmark"

    and i don't think vikings will save you , first sahara is quite hot for them :p and no democracy will recongize sadr before a vote, that's just denying the will of sahraouis it's antidemocratic, another reason is more economical, the moroccan market is quite important no big country will risk to lose it

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  19. This is perfect for the agriculture because they can get advantage of that, so the problem is that the quantity of water in there can increase the the next years I think that's something dangerous too.m10m

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