Friday, June 27, 2008

Have Sahrawis started naming streets after activists?

While researching the earlier post about torturer Ichi Aboulhassan, I noticed something strange: a couple sites, when describing where one of Ichi's assaults occurred, referred to streets named after Sahrawi activists.

For example, this page mentions "Ali Salem Tamek Place" as well as Daddach Street. One called a street Sidi Mohammed Daddach street, but I can't find it now.

It's puzzling because I doubt Morocco would be eager to name streets after dissidents. This might be an error translating text that's meant to mean they were visiting a person's home, but if not it's interesting.

22 comments:

  1. Malainin Lakhal9:59 PM

    Hi Will, you're right, the moroccan colonial authorities are far from accepting to name streets after Saharawi activists, but the Saharawi population does. It is another aspect of the resistance, to chose Saharawi names for streets, neighbourhoods and places, and to reject the moroccan names the authorities are giving them.

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  2. first i would like to welcome Mr.Malainin Lkhal if he is the real one and if he is not but he remains one of the luchadores that i admire because of his efforts either in the camps or abroad for rising awareness of our cause.

    nice from you Will to notice that i think the sahrawi population here in the occupied zone of western sahara has always invented certain kind of objection to the moroccan occupation in many ways such as getting a SADR ID or naming neighborhoods in their original names instead of the new ones gived to it by the moroccan authorities such as POLKO and SOUG EJMAL...but i think the message is clearly understood by the moroccans,it even sometimes cause you troubles as when you are asked by the police where do you live?and you reply POLKO or other /ex-called/ names they told you :is their a neighborhood called...in Aaiun?

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  3. Anonymous11:03 AM

    Where is Kind M. -V ?
    According to Spanish” El Imparcial” all western allies asking the same Q. now
    Even President Sarkozy asked him (KM6) to go home according to the same newspaper
    He hasn’t been at home since 20.05 !!!
    You can read more in upes.org and Arabic newspaper “ Alguds Al arabi “

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  4. Interesting stuff if true, most recent Anonymous. I'll have to check it out.

    Hey, Malainin. Glad to have you commenting. That's very interesting stuff and a heartening example of Sahrawi resistance.

    Devotee, you need to learn the Moroccan names of your neighborhoods so you don't get arrested. Can't have you getting into trouble--I need all my commenters now that Saad's gone.

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  5. If I were you, I won't trust El Imparcial at all!

    ;-)


    AX 19:39h.

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  6. http://www.wsrw.org/index.php?parse_news=single&cat=105&art=763

    what EU should give to Morocco is not precisely an "advanced status".

    ;-)

    AX 19:53h.

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  7. Laroussi4:26 PM

    Next week France takes over the presidency of the European Union, and French prime minister François Fillon promised in April this year that France would push for an EU deal with Morocco during the French term. Italian ANSA has an English version of the statement from Fillon.

    Here's a Reuters story in English about the deal from October last year.

    I have nothing against the EU having close ties with Morocco, but not as long as the enchanting kingdom maintains its occupation of Western Sahara.

    The EU should instead use this deal, or other parts of its relations with Morocco, to persuade the kingdom to allow self-determination for the Saharawi people and hold the promised referendum which Morocco agreed to already in 1991.

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  8. Ah geez, France being the head of the EU is exactly what Western Sahara doesn't need. Why don't they give it to Western Sahara's pals in Sweden?

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  9. Well, I've just read the funny comments Le Figaro readers wrote on this issue last April. Combined with Sarko gov. unpopularity and the fact that such an advanced status, if I'm not wrong, must be approved by unanimity of all Member States is maybe just French rhetoric to strength Moroccan French cooperation (or I'm trying to convince myself?)

    As the Turkish candidature has been seen as a menace to EU coherence, Sarko proposed for this country that kind of status.

    Unfortunately Portugal and Spain would support French initiative for commercial interests. Among others, avoiding taxes in importing European products manufactured in Morocco could be a big deal for southern Europe countries.

    Anyway it's time to work on a boycott campaign for this aberrant proposal that could foresee cooperation on important fields like defense!

    AX 01:16h

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  10. for more on the Mediterranean Union you can see inside story
    part 1
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ldLvvApwrk

    part 2
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gB-qlwWN_QI

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  11. Anonymous12:24 AM

    Despite the fact that the land borders between the two states have been closed since 1994, Morocco is the main African trade partner of Algeria, Ministerial Delegate of Maghreb and African Affairs, Abdelkader Messahel, said, quoted by the Algerian media. "The trade volume between the two states reached in 2007 a total $570 million, a figure which is higher than in the other states of the region," the minister specified. In 2007 the Algerian trade was $400 million with Tunisia and Egypt, $10 million with Libya and $3 million with Mauritania. Despite underlying that "the question of the borders must be faced by evaluating the bilateral context, as well as the regional one", Messahel specified that "there are many daily flights which connect the two countries, 550,000 Algerians went to Morocco in 2007 and 45,000 Moroccans currently live in Algeria".
    so if you guys thing that the two countries will go to war because of polisario then you're mistaken.
    polisario is just a mistake its the leftover of the cold war .

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  12. Saharawi student1:03 AM

    Last anonymous, what you wrote is interesting and suggests at least two things.

    The Moroccan propaganda which indicates that the conflict is between Algeria and Morocco is completely wrong.

    Moreover, the attempt by Morocco to convince the West that there is a risk of instability and war between Algeria and Morocco which may destabilise the Moroccan Kingdom and the region is also wrong.

    The other issue is that Morocco is wasting its much needed money to buy arms such as the recent purchase of F16s from the US.

    So why is Morocco blaming Algeria for all its ills?

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  13. Sahrawi Student, be calm with Will's Moroccan commenters, they say one thing and the absolute contrary at the same time. They've said for years that is Algeria which has a problem with Morocco. We all know is Morocco which has many problems with every neighbour country (Algeria, Spain, Mauritania, Western Sahara).

    they are so boring,

    :-|

    AX 11:58h.

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  14. France being the head of the EU is exactly what Western Sahara doesn't need. Why don't they give it to Western Sahara's pals in Sweden?

    Sweden will take the presidency in the latter half of 2009, but I wouldn't expect it to make much difference. (It rotates, with the Czech Republic in between France & Sweden.)

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  15. I've just seen the Aljazeera video on Med Union DEv linked,

    In fact Sarko came back home with a 4.3 Bl$ contract for the construction of a TGV line Tanger - Marrakesh, in a country with an illiterate rate of 43% is more than unethical!

    Sarko wants to re-launch the stalled French economy by selling useless high tech stuff to former colonies...

    Dev: Med Union is different than the "advanced status" Morocco asked to EU and likely France would concede (conditional is unavoidable).

    AX 12:44h.

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  16. Anonymous11:20 AM

    Ghallaoui Sidati of the Institut des Etudes African said he had been POLISARIO's ambassador in Italy and its secretary for foreign relations, and from that experience he could state that the Front was not an independent organization, but rather a tool created, financed and coordinated by Algeria in all its structures. In Italy, any diplomatic activity had to be carried out in consultation with the Algerian embassy. For example, that embassy had once ordered him to stop a humanitarian aid convoy on the grounds that it was up to Algeria to determine priorities. After that and other events, he had decided to return to his homeland, the Saharawi provinces of South Morocco.

    Such divergent views were also evident among other petitioners. Addressing the situation in the Tindouf refugee camps, in Algeria, Latifa Aït-Baala, for instance, drew attention to the international community's 30 years of silence regarding the tens of thousands of Moroccans who had been locked up in the camps and who had become hostage to the conflict between Morocco and Algeria. Algeria's claim that the people there were refugees did not accord with the Convention on Refugees because they had never been persecuted in their country of origin. The media paid no attention to the harsh realities of the Tindouf camps, which were virtual Mafia fiefdoms where the only law was that of terror

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  17. "Aït-Baala, for instance, drew attention to the international community's 30 years of silence regarding the tens of thousands of Moroccans who had been locked up in the camps and who had become hostage to the conflict between Morocco and Algeria. Algeria's claim that the people there were refugees did not accord with the Convention on Refugees because they had never been persecuted in their country of origin. The media paid no attention to the harsh realities of the Tindouf camps, which were virtual Mafia fiefdoms where the only law was that of terror"

    Similar testimonies were also provided by the Tooth Fairy and Santa Clause. Jack pointed out that it was possible for people to cross the berm via the giant beanstalk, but that the Polisario (which is in fact a front group for the Wicked Witch) had sabotaged the beanstalk using magic mirrors and poisoned apples. However, Morocco had recently received a shipment of fairy dust from "le friendly giant", and was sure that its troops would be able to rescue the princess after infiltrating the castle by turning themselves into mice.

    That's the level of believability with which we're operating here, is it not?

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  18. Heh, Nick. I was skimming that anonymous comment but wrote it off as lost when it talked about all the poor Moroccans imprisoned in Tindouf. Right...

    I'll leave EU politics to the Europeans, as I don't know as much about Over There as many of my commenters. That said, darn EU fishing deal.

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  19. Hi Will. The problem with the EU is that most Europeans leave EU politics to EU bureaucrats, whoin practice often seem to be as accountable as certain MENA monarchies. This is particularly so when it comes to foreign relations and external trade issues. However, people do get very exercised about stories about EU bureaucrats imposing standards of straightness on bananas, banning British sausages, and telling people what they can and can't name their cheeses.

    Competing with such important issues, things like the EU's treatment of Morocco and Western Sahara, its illegal exploitation of fisheries in occupied waters (seems people will turn a blind eye to anything for fish), and its general moral standpoint on international matters don't get much of a look in.

    Thanks for your earlier kind comments about the blog by the way.

    Cheers!

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    ReplyDelete