Friday, November 10, 2006

My name in Arabic means "great tragedy": confirm/deny?

I spell my name waaw, yaa, laam.

Several things, some Western Sahara related and some just blog favor-paying.
  • I'm going to see how many posts I can put out in the next hour, as I slacked a little at the end of the week.
  • I've been more up-to-date on the Western Sahara, for two reasons. You guys are linking me to great articles. Please keep doing this, as it keeps the blog fresh, and it keeps us in touch. The other thing I've done is signed up for Google Alerts, which send me an email aggregating the Western Sahara blog posts and news items of the previous day. If you're worried it won't work well and you'll get irrelevant stuff, don't be; there's some stuff that has nothing to do with Western Sahara, but usually it's a good way to keep up with parts of the internet you wouldn't normally look in.
  • Long-time commenter Studentintheus has started his own Western Sahara blog, Sahara-Views. I especially liked his post on the Guerra Olvidada, a war in the north of Western Sahara where Sahrawis and Moroccans fought side-by-side.
  • Respectable young woman and Western Saharan fan artist Kate became an intern on music blog Idolator today. While this doesn't have much to do with the Western Sahara, Kate was the first person to link to me, so I owe her. Also, Idolator's a good, frequently-updated read regardless of how you feel about Mohammed VI (he's bad).

3 comments:

  1. Anonymous11:02 AM

    Hi all

    please support her

    Actress, model, and singer Cynthia Basinet understood the power of the internet to connect people when the medium rocketed her song "Santa Baby" around the world. The empowerment and self-determination she experienced prompted her to seek new connections in new ways. In May 2001 she sang for a different audience–refugees living in the western Sahara desert. More than 80 per cent women and children, 200,000 refugees are struggling to survive in the southwest corner of Algeria. Their refusal to return home and their fight for self-determination captured the attention of Cynthia Basinet.Actress, model, and singer Cynthia Basinet understood the power of the Internet to connect people when the medium rocketed her song, "Santa Baby," around the world. The empowerment and self-determination she experienced prompted her to seek new connections in new ways. In May,2001 she sang for a different audience -– refugees living in the western Sahara desert. More than 80 percent women and children, 200,000 refugees are struggling to survive in the southwest corner of Algeria. Their refusal to return home and their fight for self-determination captured the attention of Cynthia Basinet.

    Growing up in San Jose, California, Cynthia sang and played the flute and saxophone as a child. Her life has been a succession of journeys. In 1984, she and her infant son left San Francisco and an abusive husband to spend five years in Europe, and it was there that she learned more about world issues. In Paris she learned to speak fluent French, studied cinematography, and became a successful model. She returned to Los Angeles with an expanded vision and a determination to become socially active.

    Cynthia established an entirely new channel of distribution for her music by using the Internet to bypass the usual Hollywood and recording industry paths, bringing her releases directly to listeners around the world. She is famous for the song, "Santa Baby." "That was my gift to the world for the millennium," she said. "One moment where people from all these countries sing to some silly love song . . ."

    Her goal in visiting the Saharawis was to help communicate their value to the world. "We are all linked. The strength and conviction of the Saharawis is something that deserves to be highlighted in the conscience of not only America, but the world. The same issues of power apply to the 85 percent working class that makes up America.
    Displaced societies are of value. Their issues are our issues"

    She was moved by the connection she felt to the Saharawis. "I hit this note, and all the women started warbling. You know, that Arabic sound the women make. It was the most healing moment in my life."

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  2. According to Hanz Wehr's Arabic dictionary, the root wa-ya-lam [wail] is 'affliction, distress, woe'; i.e., wailaka="woe unto you!"
    -SW

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